Sea of joy – Lulim whale migration 2018

What a joy the whales that visit Lulim continue to be. This year was no exception of steady use of the waters in and around Lulim to give birth, wean, train, and socialise as mother and infant, and as social groups, preparing to return to Antarctica.

The first of our sightings may, according to anectdotal evidence, have been one of the first for the year in this area of the Lalang-Garram marine park, and it was on welcome as the Arraluli clan returned to the camp for the season in late June.

The whale use of the area was steady for the season through to September when the survey was closed.

This year the project spent substantially more time on the water, with regular passage from Freshwater Cove through to Doubtful Bay. Surveys were also conducted around the Hall Point area, and in the inshore areas up to south west Augustus.

We also witnessed for the first-time activity of whales close up in and around west side of the Montgomery Islands.

Our survey activity remains concentrated around the use of the corridor north and south inshore Montgomery from Doubtful Bay to Hall Point.

We weren’t disappointed with a steady number of mothers and infants sighted directly off the camp observation position in the last week of June and through to the second week of September.

Some great interactions were had throughout country this year.

In one encounter, a lost infant was again re-united with its mother off High Cliffy Islands, captured on video by our crew.

In another, a group of up to five adults swum and dove energetically around a heavily pregnant female slowly moving to a sacred tribal water that is also known to be an area used by whales.

The range of behaviours was consistent with previous years’ observations, but we find each interaction each year also has its own variance and personality.

Natural reef formations around Wijingarra areas that have been noted in the past as significant guides for whale navigations, continued to be high activity areas.

We also observed a lot of activity at Foam Passage, in and out of Doubtful Bay, with regular mother and calf sightings.

Surveyed numbers appeared slightly less activity than last year, but we used some differing survey approaches and did not have a consistent sample period.

Several stages of birth observed in the inshore areas and bays between Doubtful Bay and Lulim Island, show that this continues to be an area for quite late pregnancies, where mothers often spend some time giving birth in shallower waters, where one was observed breaching just prior to going into final labour.

Overall Arraluli areas continued to be utilised by the humpbacks, or mundumbun as we call them, as a maternity ward, nursery, meeting and staging point. The presence is undeniable in the bays and inshore and island waters for more than 3 months it would appear from our recordings over the past 6 years. It may be more.

Caption: Mother inshore Lulim waiting to give birth.

Vale to more friends of the project – Michael Edols

The project and the Arraluli clan were sad to farewell good friend and filmmaker Michael Edols this year. Michael filmed two movies in Lulim, with the second (When the Snake Bites the Sun) featuring current Traditional Owner Isobel Peters’ mother Amy.

Isobel had retained a strong connection with Michael after catching up with him in northern Sydney for the first time since she was a child and appeared in a third Edols movie filmed in and around Derby.

The news of his passing came to us in country in the very areas he so fortuitously captured at the behest of the elders, documenting the land and waters as well as the complex social relationships that go with family, culture and country. In traditional Worrora fashion, a shooting star was observed the evening prior to receiving the news. Our thoughts go with Michael, his beloved wife Marion and his family, and of great times shared, and future times that will not.

One of Michael’s favourite lines after re-igniting his contact with country through Isobel, was “I am glad to have a skin relationship again.” Michael was referring to his tribal relationship to Isobel, which in skin system was father, given to him in the ceremony filmed in When the Snake Bites the Sun. Michael’s efforts for our family and tribe will always be remembered.

This picture is of Michael and Isobel.

Rock art – busting the mystery myth

Presence in country including guided tours to land sites in Arraluli areas, brings with it engagement with opinions and questions about the rock art in our country.

Firstly, these are places that are sacred and unique to us, we have stories for them, and we know how they place in our culture, and inside wider human culture. Secondly, the idea of a mystery race is a myth masked by pseudo-science and selective and abstract referencing coupled with stark and strategic omissions. In short, the theories of the mystery race are offensive on cultural as well as scientific grounds. This is not just the view of the Arraluli clan. It was the positions of the elders winning Native Title, and a position conferred by many academics including the Australian Archaeological Association.

The Arraluli-Worrora cosmology and history is supported by numerous studies across disciplines.

Bradshaw art is known as Gwion (Guyon) and elders created a specific educational product in the book Gwion Gwion to address the lack of recording and availability of their rich connection to all the rock art in the Kimberley, including these very old images in our coastal areas.

We suggest as a starting point that people access this book and understand the explanations of the elders of the culture contained in the ‘rock art’, and how it is special to the foundations of our culture, a culture recognised by the Australian Government, and that is not under any identity dispute.

We also encourage you to view this clip and associated notes put together in 2001 for public viewing and education where one of our senior lawman from the Ngarinyin tribe, representing all our culture, explains what Wandjina and Gwion are, and how we three tribes are connected to them through law and culture. We cannot say it better than this. Nor should we try.

https://aso.gov.au/titles/tv/message-stick-scotty-martin/clip2/

A new venture supporting whale surveys

In response to demand for coastal tour charters to access cultural sites in country, this year Isobel’s family started Wijingarra Tours. With the support of Dambimangarri Aboriginal Corporation, Tourism WA, the Western Australian Indigenous Tourism Operators Council (WAITOC) and Morrgul.

“We are following the model that was put together at Bush University by our elders before they died,” Isobel says.

“By talking to almara (strangers) in country, that is the way we can teach what our law and culture is. It has always been that way, and that’s why they taught us to do it this way, through tourism.”

The family staff that make up Wijingarra Tours – Isobel’s sons Neil and Bart, daughter Naomi, and fellow Worrora tribe members and close family Neville, Ishmael and Kerrieanne – spent time in between travelling to tours, and from base camp viewing points in downtime, conducting the whale surveys, with special mention to Naomi and Kerrianne for their work capturing early season interactions off base camp, Bart for driving the boat, and everyone contributing to the survey.

Photo caption: (left to right) Neil, Bart, Naomi, Neville, Kerrianne and Ishmael.

Wijinmgarra Tours Family Staff

The heart of the matter – observing the calving grounds

It is a privilege to see humpback whales using Arraluli areas to give birth and nurse their young.

And this year, like every other, the whales have used the area as their own for several months.

The inshore areas between Doubtful Bay, Montgomery Reef and the mainland tribal reserve in Arraluli country, is a special area where many mothers come to not only give birth, but then nurse, train and socialise infants for a journey back to the south pole.

August is considered the peak time for the migration and birth cycle, and for this month we conducted the first whale survey by traditional owners for several years.

Isobel’s daughter Naomi had already been keeping an eye on the presence in country in the lead up, relaying plenty of whales appearing along the coast for the month of July, running north from Doubtful Bay up towards Augustus Island, where they might head out back to the Buccaneer or return down through Doubtful Bay.

We set up the observation site for August on shore from the Arraluli area of Widjingarri Butt Butt.

This gives a fixed point with a view of several kilometres east and north, with viewing increased the further behind you walk up onto the ridge behind the camp. With large tides, it often increases distance to subject.

Over five weeks we watched the regular occurrence of the humpbacks moving up and down the water corridor between the reef and land.

Records were taken of the locations, directions and behaviours of the humpbacks.

Plenty of newborn whales were seen with their mothers and in social groups, and we even observed young whales playing together on several occasions.

The waters have dreamtime tracks where the behaviour synchronises with the formations of the land, making a wonderful viewing spectacle as whales mimic the creation dance of inter-tidal reef markers, islands and other natural markers.

It is also clear to us looking at the way the whales use the area, why the dreamtime stories are specific about young whales being protected in this area. There is a very observable social and biological function to the behaviour of the individuals and groups that use this area, including feeding on what are likely select diets for a dietary need.

“We never forget our old people and how they see these things, when we are out here. They knew a lot more than we do about how these things worked, and our stories in our culture tell us a lot about the dreaming of this place, where all the animals and nature is part of that story,” Isobel says.

“Every day for the month we saw whales come past, and on many days the mothers and young were right off the front of our camp, teaching their young ones how to move or behave.”

Observations included mothers showing infants how to swim, even rather dramatically chastising or commanding their attention on occasion, and groups in various stages of forming relationships and preparations to make the trip back south.

“We saw that little one they were teaching it how to use its flipper, its bibbi (Worrora word for whale flipper). The other one would do it and blow out its blowhole, and the little one would follow and hit its flipper and blow out of its blowhole,” Isobel says.

In one episode a young calf was observed by itself for several days, and was finally found by its mum  a well-known bay, at the same time as it was visited by Isobel’s sons Neil and Bart.

“We don’t know things like if the whale got lost from its mum or its mum was having difficulties.”

What we do know is that there is an incredible social interaction taking place as the new families form. By seeing whales at this stage of their life, you can see so much more of the individual situations that are taking place among them, and how needs are different as evidenced by behaviours.

“It’s amazing,” Isobel says. “This is what makes us want to be over-protective of them at these times. You know this place they are coming here for things they need.”

“They are coming so close, and we don’t want to have any obstacles, if you know what I mean.”

As if to make a point about what this place is all about, when we left in early September, an estimated 15 mothers and calves were sighted by helicopter along from the camp to Umida country, in the Worrora south.

And just like we have in recent years lost family and friends (and these were all of course noted in country), nature’s storyline delivered again. The season ended with a report of a dead whale, suspected of dying of old age, being eaten by crocodiles, and millions of online viewers, on Montgomery reef.

For us, this incident had a special consideration, because some of the biggest bulls ever witnessed, late in season, were involved in breaching activities in that very area, at the horizon line from the shore camp, heading out towards the land of the dead, in one of the most impressive duelling breach exercises witnessed in the month.  It was an amazing spectacle, one that, at the time, made us think the possibility that one had gone so high, and hit so hard, that he never bounced back – and laid where he landed, in a favourite place, having made it once more here, crossed over to the other side his spirit returned to the land. This was just one of many wonderful whale moments this season that reminds us that this is such an important and wonderful part of the world, and a place that deserves our attention to its preservation.

Arraluli Whale Sanctuary Update January 2017

Old friends and new projects – Another big year as we move forward

This year has been a big one for the Arraluli clan, the sanctuary area, and our friends and family.

Isobel at the signing with members of Dambimangari Aboriginal Corporation and rangers. Isobel originally called for a marine reserve back in 2001.

To cap the year off, Isobel attended the final signing of the Lalang-Garram Marine Park.

This has culminated years of negotiations by Isobel with her fellow countrymen and the State Government.

“My clan areas are a part of the north parks and this is a big step for me and my other tribe family members for their areas, but we are following what our old people set up for us a long way back, and how they wanted us to go in this time.”

“I see this park as a respect for ourselves and the country. We are trusting as we move forward. The Parks and Wildlife people have said they really want to support us running it our way, and that’s what we have been wanting, what we have been working for.”

“We have talked up as a clan for our voice on the whales and the reefs, and as the park grows we will be working with the joint management board to further that, and incorporate our management plan based on the traditional system for managing this country – the wunan. This is a new wurnan, that is what our old people taught us. It is wurnan including armara (non-tribe).”

“I am happy that other areas are part of this and that there is a big picture park, and I am happy the park recognises from which area we all come from to make up the bigger picture of the areas on the table.

Isobel at the signing with members of Dambimangari Aboriginal Corporation and rangers. Isobel originally called for a marine reserve back in 2001.

“If you want to go to the south with other mob at Horizontal Falls, or Cone bay, you talk to them how they want you to go there. If you want to come to Lulim areas or Jowjabai,

Isobel at her family beach at Lung-a-wurro, in Lulim, looking out on the whale dreaming line at Bibbi-ai.

you come and see us. This is how we are working. Supporting each other while at the same time making sure that our clan areas are looked after they way that we need to look after them.

“We look forward to bringing out more of the history of my people in this area as we open it up to the world. We are working on the new wurnan that the past of our elders put together for us
to work in this time, to share our culture and our country. When we follow wurnan everything works out, when we don’t things go wrong – and some of the biggest stories of our culture is about this.”

Isobel said the AWSP will continue to exist as a project in its own right into the future. “I still have a lot to go until we are happy that those areas with very high values are protected by all this paperwork.”

“We also want to start to bring friends of the Arraluli Whale Sanctuary Project out to country to experience firsthand the environment and its diversity and continue our work as a clan mapping this.”

As we balance reflection on our past, and looking forward to our future, the clan and everyone at the AWSP note with particular sadness the loss of Dr Steve Blake to our world. Dr Steve had been a great associate and friend of the sanctuary project. Steve remains the only scientist to have contacted and worked closely with us in this time and paid respect to the Aboriginal point of view during the announcement of the ‘discovery’ of the whale sanctuary.

“He understood we were still living as a people and still looking after in our own ways the environment and the marine life and animals.”

To his credit as a person and as a scientist, Steve immediately warmed to our cultural view and saw it as subject to social and scientific ethics, which bought him into some conflict of viewpoint with others in his academic world at this time.

Isobel at her family beach at Lung-a-wurro, in Lulim, looking out on the whale dreaming line at Bibbi-ai.

Isobel with the Blake family at Widjingarri Butt Butt.

“He showed us respect in our Aboriginal observations and records as important knowledge in trying to understand this important place. Steve also got to learn about the politics we face as Aboriginal people and TOs.”

We will miss the many hours of conversation with Steve, and his contributions to marine science in our area. It was with much delight that Steve’s family, wife Janine and daughters Bianca, Zoe and Lucy, made the pilgrimage out to Lunga’wurro as per Steve’s wishes. It was over the songline of Lunga’wurro that Steve first bonded with our clan, and he relayed to us his profound scientific and personal experiences in and around this area, as a human and as a marine biologist. We both got a lot out of the work that was managed to be completed, and we thank Steve and his family immensely for his contribution to this area being recognised as a valuable and rare tropical marine ecosystem. We are lucky to have the media artefacts that Steve was such a big part putting together,

Isobel meets Michael Edols for the first time since she was a child. Michael made two movies in Lulim country in the 70s and 80s

that are the only pieces of reporting from the time that respected the true Aboriginal history of the area, the heart of the sanctuary, and it was fabulous to have his family in country to see how beautiful and significant the place that their dad fell in love with is. We will continue the work that Steve helped start with us.

We caught up with filmmaker Michael Edols this year.

“Michael’s series of films in the 1970s and 80s are films that feature Arraluli clan country, and my family including my mother in the movie When The Snake Bites The Sun,” Isobel said.

In 2015 a painting of Isobel’s hand on tree bark filmed during the 1975 movie Floating…like wind blow ‘em about went on sale at auction in London for thousands of pounds.

Isobel enjoyed Michael recalling the genesis of his films he made with her elders, and shared her own recollections from those times and the making of the movies.

“It was good to sit down with Michael Edols and talk about when those movies were made with my old people. I was there as a young child when this was happening.

“Lalai Dreamtime and When The Snake Bites The Sun both use my mum’s country for filming and culture stories.”

“When the Snake Bites the Sun is about taking my mum back to country to complete

Still from the movie Lalai Dreamtime of the Wandjina Namaralee as it appears in the Arr’a’luli (Art’arrda’lu’li’ee) clan burial chamber in Lulim.

a ceremony to clear up
the first movie, which had no-one from my mum’s

clan in but filmed the caves and places of my grandfathers. These are very sacred places and are burial places for my clan and for the Wandjina too.”

“They show a bit of how my people lived here for too many years, and also where our peoples are now, which Michael was
telling us about these discussions with our old people, talking that I remember as a young girl.

“This is my family so it was very special to spend time with someone like him who worked with them back then on these movies.

“They were smart people and knew what they were doing making these movies for us children to live in this time.”

We look forward to continuing the friendship we established with Michael and his wife Marion and thank the lovely staff and locals at Ku-ring-gai National Park who we met during our visit to NSW.

Respecting our history

Lulim whales familyEach year new lives are born and created in our country. In the case of our well known migrating species the humpback, many come back and also, eventually, some never return. So too it is with our people. This country is where the whales are born and also where there spirits are caught by their parents. This is the way of all life in this country. As whales migrate to and from of our country each year, fulfilling the cycle of life, my peoples have their own journey across our country and sea.

 

Paddy Nyawarra

Paddy Nyawarra

This year we need to mark that two of our founding members and patrons – Paddy Nyawarra and Roy Wigan – have left us in this time. Anyone who knew these two men would need no introduction on what significant men and leaders of Aboriginal people, they were. They were men of high degree and stature in their own tribes, including representing their peoples in long negotiations with government over native title and other issues. They were active practitioners of traditional law and culture, and senior proponents of Aboriginal cultural heritage and maintenance in the Kimberley

Roy Wigan

Roy Wigan

They were also closely associated with Arraluli clan and country, the apex place where the mundumbun, or humpback whales, come to breed and swim eachyear. Both were senior authorities and repositories of oral stories and observations of the whales as they exist in the dreamtime, and in this time, observing over many years in the first half of the 20th century, humpbacks migrating to our waters, swimming among the islands, giving birth. Both spent time in country with the ancestors, living among this ‘newly discovered’ world of exceptional marine and terrestrial biodiversity. In Roy’s case, as a Bardi man, he saw whales over many years passing through his tribe’s country as they move north into Arraluli country, sometimes having their babies on the way in the bays north of Broome. He also observed them in Arraluli country as a young boy growing up with Isobel’s mothers and fathers.

Both supported the Arraluli Whale Sanctuary Project from day one.

“Married to my mum’s sister, Paddy was the custodian of the song for the heart of Lulim country whales, Lungawurro, the epicentre of the Kimberley whales’ migration to and from country, from birth to parenthood, which Arraluli hold now in this time.”

“Although both of different tribes, they knew the significance of my country and spent time with the senior men and women in this country, my ancestors, before our peoples were moved, swimming, navigating small boats, doing Aboriginal law and culture business. I cannot speak too highly of them honoring    my family and my country who they were part of in not only tribal relationship but as part of my family through marriage and family culture.”

These men also had very direct memories and observations of the whales in the country that in moments they shared to support our project in raising awareness of the value of our places, and as a place for whales to breed and give birth in the way they have since they started in creation.

Issy reef mappingFollowers of the Arraluli project will remember when Isobel went out with the film crew from Channel 7 Sunday Night at the time the whale breeding area had been ‘discovered’, and Roy sung on national TV a song about the mother and baby whale learning the first steps of life. What many would not know is that Roy had stepped in for Paddy at the last minute on that trip.

We will miss both of them but their influence will also be with us keeping us strong and on track for a long time.

Lulim and its areas is a very significant country respected by all the Worrora tribe and all the surrounding tribes of the Wandjina and also the other tribes of the Kimberley.  

We are also moving closer to our plans for managing country in the way that we want – that respects and allows to be supported by our culture and ways, as the traditional owners, the ways that old people like Paddy and Roy educated so many people, in their tribal ways, and to ‘armaras’ – or non-tribe people, strangers.

There is more interest in the land and sea country than ever before.

Because we have such big tides in our country, we are busy talking about how our rights can be incorporated with the government to allow navigation of the marine park. We have still a long way to go but are aiming to make sure there is clear rules for the tourism and research and recreational industries to navigate through country and to be able to hook up with us and our neighboring countryman for on ground access.

Having our own people directing on country is best for everyone. It makes sure that no damage is done and people get the strongest and real experience of not just contacting our country, but our culture that governs that country, and that is alive today.

Paddy and Roy both supported this. It is the way that the Old People want us people in this time to manage our country and keep some values of our old peoples’ ways alive, to benefit us, and the country, and its life, which we are connected to by our ancestors and our creators.

We look forward to more exciting news this year as we continue to support the humpbacks and other life that lives in our country and need our support.

May 2014

It has been quite a while since we have provided an update on the Arraluli Whale Sanctuary Project.

Lulim whales HP 2012 PC 02JPG light

At the time of our last update Arraluli Traditional Owner Isobel Peters had just returned from visiting the whale sanctuary grounds with a documentary TV film crew and a Federal national heritage assessor.

Shortly after that the State government announced its intention to create a marine park that would encompass the AWSP areas, as well as other areas to the south. The Federal government also gave a national heritage listing to Montgomery reef.
These were two important steps in both State and Federal governments recognising the unique biodiversity and cultural and wilderness values of this area of Western Australia inside which the Arraluli clan areas exist.

“It made us feel good that there was some sense coming in about this area’s values. Even if the government seemed to not be directly engaging with us Traditional Owners properly through these processes, the message was getting through,” says Isobel who provided written submissions to both the State and Federal plans.Lulim whales HP 2012 PC 03 light

In early 2014 Isobel Peters accepted a board position on the joint management board for the Western Australian government’s Lalang-garram Camden Sound Marine Park.

“I accepted the offer to represent myself as one of the major traditional owners whose country makes up the marine park areas,” Isobel says.

Isobel will continue through her position on the park board, and as a senior member of the Worrora tribe and head of the Arraluli clan, to advocate for key issues that still need to be addressed in regard to the marine park.

“These are protecting areas from damage, particularly where the wilderness values are rare and are used for breeding cycles of all life including the humpback whales.

“There is still a lot of this going around the edges, and not listening to us as a Traditional Owner, even though we have been right since day one and proved it to them that we know about this area and how significant it is in marine science as well as for our Creation stories.”

The main priorities for the AWSP and the Arraluli is to continue to advocate for enforcement of their legal rights, which leadsMontgomery reef biodiversity to the greater protection of the environmental values.

“Right now we want a few important things to progress, the first of which is fixing up areas in the marine park that are not mapped out properly and leave very sensitive places open for damage.

“The second, and just as important, is to stop all walking on reef and sensitive lands and islands in the area. Under Australian law anyone who does this in Arraluli areas is trespassing and can be prosecuted.

“What we want is cooperation from tourist operators and other users in changing their behaviour.

“We will then work with them to deliver a rich experience they will remember.”

World first whale research

When the AWSP members first started to speak to government and other stakeholders, none of them, not even the top funded whale researchers who later claimed the glory of discovery, even knew that Arraluli was a whale birthing and nursing ground.

“Originally the only people who knew this were my people and the people who worked for us and a few of the Captains who had spent some time in the waters and shared their knowledge with us.

In the process of engaging with the research ‘awakening’ and its push for a stake in the new wonder of Western Australia, the Arraluli have assisted in the first research from this area.

“The research is very limited, and has been done on very rough basis, but it confirms basic things like the indication of numbers and passage of whales from the end of the migration period, August to September, and how that is the period where the last of the whales are remaining in my area, mostly rearing their young.

“As the Traditional Owner our old people have shared with us many observations of the whales, and how they hang around in that area.Turtle Lulim

“These stories have led to our observations and dreaming song lines being provided for the direction of scientific research we assisted with, and then confirmed by the scientists we have worked with, about the ‘lifeforce’ around the Arraluli whale areas, exactly where we showed the scientists to look, that are the centre of the whale dreaming for our people, and they have found biota and food source at the highest levels on the planet, associated with intense life chain and biodiversity.”

Interviewed several years ago on Australian television in a story about the whale migration to the area, Isobel told how her old people had songs for the whales, and how elders in her tribe, who had spent time with her largely deceased family, sung songs in traditional language of the whales and their role in the creation of the unique formations and inter-tidal flows that mark this rich marine environment.

These deeds, recorded in song, champion the carving of the coastal rock, and the shaping of the tidal movements by the whale’s flipper. They are also actual observable natural forces creating what scientists today have observed to be the essence of the environment that builds the food chain that sees these creatures apex their northern migration from the depths of the arctic, to suckle and train their infants, newly born in the waters south to here once a year. In other words they have directed scientists to the discovery areasm, and in doing so confirmed the perennial tribal custodianship of scientific observations of the ecology of this area.

Preliminary data has indicated that the area is abnormally ‘productive’ in terms of biota not just for Kimberley standards but Australian and indeed, international- just as Isobel had informed them when they first begun their quest.

“It’s wunguud place. It’s been created like that, for those animals to feed and grow,” she said.

The Arraluli Whale Sanctuary Project (AWSP) was established to acknowledge the voice of the Aboriginal traditional owners of the Camden sound area – the Arraluli clan of the Worrora tribe – on the issues surrounding humpback whale conservation in this remote part of North Western Australian.

It built on the groups previous work in trying to encourage recognition of the need to get help in protecting their area’s rare cultural and wilderness estate.

During the last five years, this area has come to the attention of the world as a major humpback breeding ground. The natural and biological formations have much to offer the humpback for its calving grounds, unique and rich feeding chains that nourish these huge mammals as well as a plethora of other marine life including saltwater turtles and dugongs, temperature tolerant inter-tidal reefs that provide shelter, some of the last intact marine and terrestrial eco-systems not only in Australia, but the world.

Whale calf learning to swim inshore Lulim coastline

 

Mindful of the problems that can be associated with announcing the existence of such rare environmental areas, and how it can merely stimulate a greater bloodlust for its destruction and development, the Arraluli have worked hurrriedly with key agencies and organisations to codify their traditional land rights into a wilderness estate. Stay tuned for more updates or to send isobel an email:

arraluli@gmail.com